A while back, I constructed a short story of debatable quality using famous lines from classic works. In celebration of National Poetry Month, I would like to do the same thing again. Only this time I’ve taken first lines of poetry and reconstructed them into a new piece of work. See if you recognize any of these poetic openers.

She Sang Alone

I wandered lonely as a cloud
A batter’d, wreck’d old man
Before the wind, with rain-drowned stocks,
Before the paling of the stars,
Before the coming of the dark

She stood among the lilies
She stood among the longest ferns
She stood before her traitors bound and bare
She should never have looked at me
I am an outcast, sinful and vile
I am stirred by the dream of an afternoon
I am a lake, altered by every wind

She sang a song of May for me
She sung of love, while ‘oer her lyre
She sang alone

The church flings forth a battled shade
They put their finger on their lip
There is not much that I can do
The short hour’s halt is ended

 

Original works, by line:
Daffodils, William Wordsworth
Prayer of Columbus, Walt Whitman
The Clearing, Madison Cawein
Before the Paling of the Stars, Christina Rossetti
The Ride Back, William Moody
Among the Lilies, Susan Coolidge
The Hamadryad, Madison Cawein
The Moderates, Algernon Swoinburne
Cristina, Robert Browning
Wages of Sin, Marietta Holley
An Afternoon, Ella Wilcox
The Lake, Sir John Squire
A Spring Song, James Whitcomb Riley
She Sung of Love, Thomas More
Lydia Sigourney, John Greenleaf Whittier
Church-Builder, Thomas Hardy
Eros, Ralph Waldo Emerson
At the Railway Station, Thomas Hardy
Fall In My Men, Fall In, Henry Lawson